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Managed Security Services Provider Morning News: 25 September 2017

Each morning MSSP Alert broadcasts a quick lineup of news, analysis and chatter from across the global managed security services provider, SOC (security operations center) and IT outsourcing ecosystem.

Here’s the lineup for Monday, September 25, 2017:

6. M&A – Identity: SAP has acquired Gigya, an identity and access management specialist. Gigya’s platform allows companies to manage customers’ profile, preference, opt-in and consent settings, with customers maintaining control of their data at all times, SAP says. Gigya has more than 300 employees and is headquartered in Mountain View, Calif. Financial terms were not disclosed.

5. State Hacking: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) says Russia targeted 21 states as part of a hacking campaign involving the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.

4. SEC Hack Investigation: The Investment Company Institute (ICI), which represents over 95 million U.S. shareholders, wants the SEC to clear up concerns about its cyber defenses before requiring funds to submit monthly performance data to the regulator, Paul Schott Stevens, the group’s chief executive, told Reuters in a phone interview. The SEC earlier this month disclosed a 2016 hack that may have led to financial gain for those involved. Also, DHS warned the SEC in January 2017 that the agency had major security weaknesses.

3. Attacking Kaspersky Lab: Desktop Alert is praising the U.S. Department of Homeland Security decision to ban Kasperksy Lab’s software from federal networks.  Desktop Alert is the nation’s second largest Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) certified provider of IP-Based emergency mass notification systems to the United States Department of Defense. U.S. officials allege that Kaspersky may have ties to Russia’s government. Kaspersky has repeatedly denied the claims.

2. Another Kaspersky: A Russian security company run by Kaspersky Lab’s co-founder is introducing a smartphone that prevents Google and other apps from snooping on users, seeking to capitalize on the country’s tensions with the U.S., Bloomberg says. The Taiga phone, designed by Moscow-based InfoWatch Group, runs its own Android-based firmware that lets apps run on the device but stops them from collecting data, the report says. The company’s leader is Natalya Kaspersky, the ex-wife of Eugene Kaspersky.

1. Top 100 Managed Security Services Providers: We’ll unveil the list and research during our webcast this Thursday, Sept. 28. Register here to join us.

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